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Elections, Legislative Sessions, & Other Civics Topics

In this brief piece we introduce important, inspiring, and easy-to-implement ideas. Most homeschoolers know that new legislation can affect educational freedom tremendously. After all, we gained the right to homeschool through valiant legislative effort back in 1986.  We have both lost and gained freedom in subsequent legislative sessions. 

It should make perfect sense, then, that elections are important – and for much more than just homeschooling. The fact that we live in a “government by the people” should feel like a privilege and a great responsibility. The people who are elected can and do change our lives significantly!

That translates into voting. Surely every Christian should vote unless providentially hindered. And shouldn’t every homeschooled student who turns 18 be chomping at the bits to participate in the process? We should specifically vote to God’s glory – in light of “So then whether you eat or drink or whatsoever you do, do all to the glory of God.” The question is, “What candidate will further the freedom to do God’s will in this city/state/nation?”

To that end, we encourage parents to teach their student civics!  There are myriad ways to accomplish that, but here we’ll mention three.

  1. CHEWV’s free Your Guide to U.S. Civics

Ten units cover historic figures, founding documents, the three branches of government, how laws are made, and much more. Find this extensive guide in the member resources. 

  1. Home School Day at the Capitol

Our annual gathering at Charleston to tour the Capitol, participate in the legislative process, and put homeschooling on display.

  1. Whatever Happened to Justice?

One of the Uncle Eric books by Richard Maybury, this respected 1992 book explores the concepts upon which America’s laws were built, including higher law, common law, privilege, and other concepts from the vantage point of natural law. Add the Bluestocking guide to turn this into a work-already-done-for-you unit study.