Your Guide to U.S. Civics: A Review by John Carey

by | Nov 10, 2020 | Articles

by John Carey, CHEWV’s Legislative Liaison

CHEWV now offers an exciting FREE member resource, Your Guide to U.S. Civics, to help families study American civics and government.

This resourhttps://chewv.orgce is composed of 10 units which cover historic figures, founding documents, the three branches of government, a breakdown of how laws are made, and much more.  An additional unit is dedicated specifically to West Virginia civics.

Your Guide to U.S. Civics also contains links to founding documents, supplementary articles and YouTube videos, a list of recommended books to purchase, and a list of suggested historical films (such as Mr. Smith goes to Washington).

As explained in the materials, families can complete the guide in a year by working through one unit each week, or they can finish in a single semester by doing two units a week.

The goal is to learn about these important topics in a fun and inspiring way. We believe it is incredibly important for citizens to understand the form of government that we have inherited. That understanding enables us to defend and advance our freedoms, and to insist that our elected representatives do the same.

As Thomas Jefferson said in his Inaugural Address:

“[These principles] should be the creed of our political faith, the text of civic instruction, the touchstone by which to try to services of those we trust; and should we wander from them in moments of error or of alarm, let us hasten to retrace our steps and regain the road which alone leads to peace, liberty, and safety.”

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